Episode 123
Episode 123
Production code P228/123
ITV transmission date 14th February 1962 (Wednesday)
Stories by Harry Driver
Vince Powell
Writer Jack Rosenthal
Designer Denis Parkin
Director Richard Everitt
Producer Derek Granger
Previous episode 12th February 1962
Next episode 19th February 1962


Annie thinks she's found blood on the Rovers' floor as she cleans up and is annoyed that Jack isn't bothered by the fight. Ken has concussion from a cut on his head and has been told to stay in bed by Dr. Graham. Frank is upset that Ken doesn't like the area he was brought up in but his son assures him he doesn't want to leave him. Ken refuses to stay in bed. Florrie tells Albert she's had lots of extra customers, sightseeing the now-infamous street, but Martha is insulted by gawping kids giving cheek. Frank is snubbed by Harry in the Corner Shop and gets a cold reception from Concepta, Florrie and Martha. Annie has had enough of the sightseers and reporters. Harry is offered a lot of money for Lucky Lolita. The Banner newspaper rings the Rovers asking for Ken and Jack goes to fetch him. Len and Harry are in the pub when he walks in, annoying them when he claims he's "fighting fit" again. Jack and Annie try to calm the two men. The paper asks Ken to write articles on "Life in a typical Northern town" and he goads Len to punch him again. Despite his previous doubts, Frank thinks Ken should write the articles when he hears about the 180 guinea fee. The landlord is stirred into action by the article and sends letters to all the residents offering to do all necessary improvements to the houses. Ken can't make up his mind about doing the articles. Harry refuses to believe the article inspired the landlord and rows with Concepta over the matter. Len also angrily disagrees with the notion and is rude to Martha. Annie and Jack wonder if Ken will write the articles. Martha reports that Ena is nursing an ill Minnie. Ken decides not to write the articles. He takes Frank to the Rovers for a drink where Harry and Len are still in a state of high dudgeon. Ken announces he's not writing the articles but when Len thinks he's not doing them because he's had enough trouble Ken changes his mind and decides to accept the offer.


Regular castEdit

Guest castEdit




  • Studio rehearsal footage from this episode, specifically from the opening scene between Jack and Annie Walker in the Rovers Return Inn, was located in 2013 in the ITV archives and featured the following year in the documentary Coronation Street: A Moving Story.
  • Albert Tatlock speaks of having heard left-wing politician Sidney Webb speak several times in his youth and witnessed his wife Beatrice receive a degree from Manchester University. That ceremony took place in July 1909.
  • Elsie Tanner speaks of the landlord and refers to him as Mr Fanackerpan, leading modern commentators to assume this was his actual name. In reality the name was a northern colloquialism used at the time that this episode was made which has since fallen into disuse. It was the subject of a song sung by Gracie Fields and entitled Fred Fanackerpan but its reference in this episode was probably in relation to the comment made by parents of dawdling children when they called them "Mary Ann Fanackerpan" and is thus a sarcastic comment made by Elsie to the lack of progress made by their landlord in doing repairs to their houses until shamed into it by Ken Barlow's article. The landlord's name was later given in the programme as Edward Wormold.
  • TV Times synopsis: Kenneth slowly recovers from the uproar of the previous evening and decides to stick by what he believes. As things begin to settle down, the other residents of the Street learn that getting into the headlines can also make for unexpected results.
  • Viewing Figures: First UK broadcast - 8,114,000 homes (1st place).
February 1962 episodes
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